preamble attached >>>
ADs updated daily at www.Tdata.com
PROPOSED AD AIRBUS HELICOPTERS: Docket No. FAA-2022-0015; Project Identifier AD-2021-00832-R.
(a) COMMENTS DUE DATE

    The FAA  must receive  comments on  this airworthiness  directive (AD)
    action by September 12, 2022.

(b) AFFECTED ADS

    This  AD  replaces AD  2020-23-05,  Amendment 39-21321  (85  FR 73604,
    November 19, 2020) (AD 2020-23-05).

(c) APPLICABILITY

    This  AD  applies  to Airbus  Helicopters  Model  EC225LP helicopters,
    certificated  in  any  category,  with  a  main  rotor  (M/R) rotating
    swashplate  (swashplate)  part  number  (P/N)  332A31-3074-00  or  P/N
    332A31-3074-01 installed.

(d) SUBJECT

    Joint  Aircraft  Service  Component  (JASC)  Code:  6230,  Main  Rotor
    Mast/Swashplate.

(e) UNSAFE CONDITION

    This AD was  prompted by results  of testing, which  determined that a
    crack  could  develop  in a  swashplate  control  rod attachment  yoke
    (yoke),  and  the  notification  of  a  new  life  limit  for  certain
    swashplates. The FAA is issuing this AD to detect and correct a  crack
    in a  yoke. The  unsafe condition,  if not  addressed, could result in
    failure  of the  yoke, loss  of M/R  control, and  subsequent loss  of
    control of the helicopter.

(f) COMPLIANCE

    Comply  with this  AD within  the compliance  times specified,  unless
    already done.

(g) REQUIRED ACTIONS

    Before  further flight,  review Appendix  4.A. of  Airbus  Helicopters
    Emergency Alert Service Bulletin (EASB) No. 05A051, Revision 4,  dated
    February  28,  2022 (EASB  05A051  Rev 4)  to  determine the  date  of
    manufacture of the swashplate.

(1) If the swashplate has accumulated  13 or more years since the  date of
    manufacture, remove the swashplate from service.

(2) If the swashplate has accumulated less than 13 years since the date of
    manufacture,  create a  component history  card or  equivalent  record
    indicating a  life limit  of 13  years since  the date of manufacture.
    Thereafter, continue to record the life limit of the swashplate on its
    component history card or equivalent record and remove any  swashplate
    from  service  before  accumulating   13  years  since  the   date  of
    manufacture.

(3) For each  swashplate that has  accumulated 7 or  more years, but  less
    than 13 years, since the date of manufacture, within 15 hours  time-in
    -service (TIS) or 7 days,  whichever occurs first after the  effective
    date of this AD,  and thereafter at intervals  not to exceed 15  hours
    TIS  or  7  days,   whichever  occurs  first,  until   the  swashplate
    accumulates 13 years since  the date of manufacture,  visually inspect
    each yoke for a crack, paying particular attention to the areas  shown
    in Details B, C, and D of Figure  1 of EASB 05A051 Rev 4. If there  is
    any crack on  the yoke, before  further flight, remove  the swashplate
    from service.

(i) If no  cracks are visually  detected, before further  flight, visually
    inspect for a scratch and surface degradation on the yoke.

(ii) If there is  any scratch or surface  degradation on the yoke,  before
     further  flight, perform a dye penetrant inspection of the yoke for a
     crack.

(iii) If there is any crack on the yoke, before further flight, remove the
      swashplate from service.

(4) For each  swashplate that has  accumulated 7 or  more years, but  less
    than 13  years, since  the date  of manufacture,  within 100 hours TIS
    after the effective date of this AD:

(i) Remove the grease from areas (E), (F), (G), (H), (J), and (K) of  each
    yoke as shown in Details B, C, and D of Figure 1 of EASB 05A051 Rev 4.
    Using a plastic spatula, strip areas (E), (F), (G), (H), (J), and  (K)
    of each  yoke as  shown in  Details B,  C, and  D of  Figure 1 of EASB
    05A051 Rev 4. Do not use a metal tool to strip any area of a yoke.

(ii) Inspect areas (E), (F), (G), (H), (J), and (K) of each yoke as  shown
     in  Details  B, C,  and  D of  Figure  1 of  EASB  05A051 Rev  4  for
     corrosion, pitting, and loss of material.

(A) If there is any  corrosion less  than 0.0078 in. (0.2 mm), before fur-
    ther flight, remove the corrosion and apply varnish (Vernelec 43022 or
    equivalent) to the surface  of areas (E), (F), (G), (H), (J), and (K).

(B) If there is  any pitting or loss  of material of less  than 0.0078 in.
    (0.2 mm),  before further  flight, remove  the damage  by sanding with
    sandpaper 200/400 or 330.

(C) If there is any corrosion, pitting, or loss of material of 0.0078  in.
    (0.2 mm) or greater, before further flight, remove the swashplate from
    service.

(iii) Visually inspect each yoke for a crack, paying particular  attention
      to the areas shown in Details B, C, and D of Figure 1 of EASB 05A051
      Rev 4.

(A) If there is any crack  on the yoke, before further flight,  remove the
    swashplate from service.

(B) If no cracks are visually detected, before further flight, perform the
    actions as required in paragraphs (g)(3)(i)  through (iii) of this AD.

(h) CREDIT FOR PREVIOUS ACTIONS

    If you performed the actions in paragraph (g)(4) of this AD before the
    effective date of  this AD using  Airbus Helicopters EASB  No. 05A051,
    Revision  1,  dated November  16,  2017; Airbus  Helicopters  EASB No.
    05A051, Revision  2, dated  February 26,  2019; or  Airbus Helicopters
    EASB No. 05A051 Revision 3, dated  December 7, 2021, you have met  the
    requirements of paragraph (g)(4) of this AD.

(i) SPECIAL FLIGHT PERMIT

    Special flight permits are prohibited.

(j) ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF COMPLIANCE (AMOCS)

(1) The Manager, International  Validation Branch, FAA, has  the authority
    to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures  found
    in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to
    your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as
    appropriate. If  sending information  directly to  the manager  of the
    International  Validation  Branch, send  it  to the  attention  of the
    person identified in  paragraph (k)(1)  of this AD. Information may be
    emailed to: 9-AVS-AIR-730-AMOC@faa.gov.

(2) Before  using  any approved  AMOC, notify  your appropriate  principal
    inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the  local
    flight standards district office/certificate  holding district office.

(k) RELATED INFORMATION

(1) For  more information  about this  AD, contact  Hal Jensen,  Aerospace
    Engineer,  Operational  Safety  Branch,  Compliance  &   Airworthiness
    Division,  FAA,  950  L'Enfant  Plaza  N  SW,  Washington,  DC  20024;
    telephone: (202) 267-9167; email: hal.jensen@faa.gov.

(2) For  service  information  identified  in   this  AD,  contact  Airbus
    Helicopters, 2701 North Forum  Drive, Grand Prairie, TX  75052; phone:
    (972)  641-0000  or  (800)   232-0323;  fax  (972)  641-3775;   or  at
    www.airbus.com/helicopters/services/technical-support.html.  You   may
    view this  referenced service  information at  the FAA,  Office of the
    Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N-321,
    Fort Worth,  TX 76177.  For information  on the  availability of  this
    material at the FAA, call (817) 222-5110.

(3) The subject of this AD is addressed in European Union Aviation  Safety
    Agency (EASA) AD  2019-0074R1, dated March  8, 2022. You  may view the
    EASA AD at www.regulations.gov in Docket No. FAA-2022-0015.

Issued  on  July  22,  2022. Gaetano  A.  Sciortino,  Deputy  Director for
Strategic  Initiatives,  Compliance  &  Airworthiness  Division,  Aircraft
Certification Service.

DATES: The FAA must receive comments on this SNPRM by  September 12, 2022.
PREAMBLE 

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration


14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2022-0015; Project Identifier AD-2021-00832-R]
RIN 2120-AA64

Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Helicopters

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNPRM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The FAA is revising a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM)
that would have applied to certain Airbus Helicopters Model EC225LP
helicopters. This action revises the NPRM by removing the requirement
to remove main rotor (M/R) rotating swashplates (swashplates) from
service that have accumulated less than 7 years since the date of
manufacture; increasing the life limit for certain swashplates;
requiring additional visual inspections, and adding repetitive
inspections for certain swashplates that have accumulated 7 or more
years, but less than 13 years, since the date of manufacture; and
updating the service information. The FAA is proposing this
airworthiness directive (AD) to address the unsafe condition on these
products. Since these actions would impose an additional burden over
those in the NPRM, the agency is requesting comments on this SNPRM.

DATES: The FAA must receive comments on this SNPRM by September 12, 2022.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR
11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to www.regulations.gov. Follow the
instructions for submitting comments.

Fax: (202) 493-2251.

Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket
Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New
Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590.

Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address between 9 a.m. and
5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
For service information identified in this SNPRM, contact Airbus
Helicopters, 2701 North Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, TX 75052; phone:
(972) 641-0000 or (800) 232-0323; fax (972) 641-3775; or at
www.airbus.com/helicopters/technical-services/support.html. You may
view this service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional
Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N-321, Fort
Worth, TX 76177. For information on the availability of this material
at the FAA, call (817) 222-5110.

Examining the AD Docket


You may examine the AD docket at www.regulations.gov by searching
for and locating Docket No. FAA-2022-0015; or in person at Docket
Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except
Federal holidays. The AD docket contains the NPRM, this SNPRM, the
European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AD, any comments received,
and other information. The street address for Docket Operations is
listed above.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Hal Jensen, Aerospace Engineer,
Operational Safety Branch, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, FAA,
950 L'Enfant Plaza N SW, Washington, DC 20024; phone: (202) 267-9167;
email: hal.jensen@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited


The FAA invites you to send any written relevant data, views, or
arguments about this proposal. Send your comments to an address listed
under ADDRESSES. Include "Docket No. FAA-2022-0015; Project Identifier
AD-2021-00832-R'' at the beginning of your comments. The most helpful
comments reference a specific portion of the proposal, explain the
reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. The FAA
will consider all comments received by the closing date and may again
revise this proposal because of those comments.

Except for Confidential Business Information (CBI) as described in
the following paragraph, and other information as described in 14 CFR
11.35, the FAA will post all comments received, without change, to
www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide.
The agency will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal
contact received about this proposed AD.

Confidential Business Information


CBI is commercial or financial information that is both customarily
and actually treated as private by its owner. Under the Freedom of
Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), CBI is exempt from public
disclosure. If your comments responsive to this SNPRM contain
commercial or financial information that is customarily treated as
private, that you actually treat as private, and that is relevant or
responsive to this SNPRM, it is important that you clearly designate
the submitted comments as CBI. Please mark each page of your submission
containing CBI as "PROPIN.'' The FAA will treat such marked
submissions as confidential under the FOIA, and they will not be placed
in the public docket of this SNPRM. Submissions containing CBI should
be sent to Hal Jensen, Aerospace Engineer, Operational Safety Branch,
Compliance & Airworthiness Division, FAA, 950 L'Enfant Plaza N SW,
Washington, DC 20024; telephone: (202) 267-9167; email:
hal.jensen@faa.gov. Any commentary that the FAA receives which is not
specifically designated as CBI will be placed in the public docket for
this rulemaking.

Background


The FAA issued an NPRM to amend 14 CFR part 39 by adding an AD that
would apply to Airbus Helicopters Model EC225LP helicopters, with an M/
R swashplate part number (P/N) 332A31-3074-00 or P/N 332A31-3074-01
installed. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on January 26,
2022 (87 FR 3943). The NPRM proposed to supersede AD 2020-23-05,
Amendment 39-21321 (85 FR 73604, November 19, 2020) (AD 2020-23-05),
which applies to certain Airbus Helicopters Model EC225LP helicopters.
AD 2020-23-05 requires inspecting the swashplate control rod attachment
yokes (yokes) of certain swashplates, establishing a life limit,
performing a one-time inspection of stripped yokes, and applicable
corrective actions. AD 2020-23-05 was prompted by a crack in a yoke,
which could result in failure of the yoke, loss of M/R control, and
subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. AD 2020-23-05 was also
prompted by EASA AD 2019-0074, dated March 28, 2019 (EASA AD 2019-
0074), issued by EASA, which is the Technical Agent for the Member
States of the European Union, to correct an unsafe condition for Airbus
Helicopters (AH), formerly Eurocopter, Eurocopter France, Model EC 225
LP helicopters. EASA advised that Airbus Helicopters established a life
limit (also called a service life limit) of 12 years for the swashplate
and added a reporting requirement if there is a crack or corrosion in a
yoke. EASA further advised that additional analysis determined that it
is necessary to introduce a new life limit for the affected
swashplates.

In the NPRM, the FAA proposed to retain all the requirements of AD
2020-23-05. The NPRM also proposed to include a revised compliance time
for the initial visual inspection of the yokes
on swashplates that have accumulated less than seven years since the
date of manufacture; and clarification that dye penetrant inspection of
the yoke is required before further flight if no cracks are detected
during the visual inspection.

The NPRM was prompted by the determination that a revised
compliance time is necessary for swashplates that have accumulated less
than seven years since the date of manufacture. The FAA has also
determined that clarification is necessary regarding when it is
necessary to do a dye penetrant inspection of the yoke.

Actions Since the NPRM Was Issued


Since the NPRM was issued, EASA issued EASA AD 2019-0074R1, dated
March 8, 2022 (EASA AD 2019-0074R1), which supersedes EASA AD 2019-
0074. EASA advises that additional investigation confirmed that the
life limit of certain swashplates can be extended and Airbus
Helicopters has issued updated service information to reflect the new
life limit.

Also, since the NPRM was issued, the FAA determined that
swashplates that have accumulated less than 7 years since the date of
manufacture are not susceptible to the unsafe condition and should be
removed from paragraph (g) of the proposed AD. The FAA also determined
that paragraph (g) of the proposed AD needs to be revised to include
repetitive inspections for swashplates that have accumulated 7 or more
years, but less than 13 years, since the date of manufacture, and the
criteria for when to perform a dye penetrant inspection needs to be
revised.

The FAA determined there was an error in the Background section of
the NPRM, which stated, "AD 2020-23-05 was prompted by a crack in a
swashplate yoke.'' The FAA determined AD 2020-23-05 was not prompted by
a crack in a yoke, but was prompted by testing conducted by Airbus
Helicopters, which determined cracks may develop overtime. The FAA also
determined that the applicable service information required by the
proposed AD needs to be revised in order to include the updated
revision.

Finally, the FAA determined that the time estimated for inspecting
the yokes needed to be increased from 0.25 work-hour to 0.50 work-hour,
which increased the estimated cost for that inspection from $21 to $43
per helicopter per inspection cycle.

Comments


The following discussion presents the comments received on the NPRM
and the FAA's response.

Request To Revise the Required Actions Paragraph of the Proposed AD


Five commenters requested the FAA revise the Required Actions
paragraph of the proposed AD by removing the visual inspection for
swashplates that have accumulated less than 7 years since the date of
manufacture. Airbus Helicopters stated that testing was performed for
certain aluminum alloys and as a result Airbus Helicopters defined a
calendar threshold of 7 years, after which the swashplate may present
crack initiation. Airbus Helicopters further explained due to this
testing, there is no rationale to require the visual inspection prior
to the 7 year threshold. An additional commenter stated the inspection
for swashplates that have accumulated less than 7 years since the date
of manufacture is not in line with the required service information.
Additionally, Air Center Helicopters Inc., explained that the EASA AD
and the service information do not require repetitive visual
inspections for any swashplates that have accumulated less than 7 years
since the date of manufacture and that these repetitive inspections are
not required until after the swashplate has accumulated 7 or more years
since the date of manufacture.

The FAA agrees and has revised the Required Actions paragraph of
this proposed AD by removing the inspection requirements for
swashplates that have accumulated less than 7 years since the date of
manufacture.

Four commenters requested the FAA revise the Required Actions
paragraph to include a repetitive visual inspection, at intervals not
to exceed 15 hours time-in-service (TIS) or 7 days, after certain
swashplates have accumulated 7 or more years since the date of
manufacture. Three commenters also requested that the FAA revise the
Required Actions paragraph of this proposed AD to require that this
repetitive visual inspection be performed utilizing a bright light and
10X magnifying glass.

The FAA partially agrees. The FAA agrees to revise the Required
Actions paragraph of this proposed AD to include a repetitive visual
inspection, at intervals not to exceed 15 hours TIS or 7 days,
whichever occurs first, for swashplates that have accumulated 7 or more
years, but less than 13 years, since the date of manufacture, until the
swashplate accumulates 13 years since the date of manufacture. The FAA
disagrees with mandating the use of a bright light and 10X magnifying
glass for this repetitive visual inspection because the FAA has not
determined that a bright light or 10X magnifying glass are necessary
for this repetitive visual inspection; however an operator may choose
to use this inspection method.

Five commenters requested the FAA revise the Required Actions
paragraph to remove the dye penetrant inspection in situations where no
crack is detected. Airbus Helicopters stated with regards to crack
detectability, the dye penetrant inspection creates an unnecessary
burden if no crack is detected visually, and should only be performed
if a scratch or surface degradation is detected. Two commenters also
stated performing the dye penetrant inspection, if a crack is not
detected, would increase the estimated costs and downtime for
operators.

The FAA agrees to revise the Required Actions paragraph of this
proposed AD to include an additional visual inspection for a scratch
and surface degradation, if no crack is detected. The FAA determined if
any indications of scratches or surface degradation are detected during
the visual inspection, a dye penetrant inspection must be performed to
address the unsafe condition. Accordingly, the FAA has revised the
Required Actions paragraph to require a visual inspection for a scratch
and surface degradation if no cracks are visually detected, and a dye
penetrant inspection if there is any scratch or surface degradation.

Five commenters requested the FAA revise the Required Actions
paragraph to extend the life limit of the swashplate from 12 years to
13 years, in accordance with the revised service information.

The FAA agrees and has revised the Required Actions paragraph of
this proposed AD by increasing the life limit of the swashplate to 13
years.

Request To Use Latest Revision of the Applicable Service Information


Three commenters requested that the FAA revise the proposed AD to
reference EASA AD 2019-0074R1 instead of EASA AD 2019-0074. The
commenters also requested that the FAA revise the proposed AD to
reference Airbus Helicopters Emergency Alert Service Bulletin (EASB)
No. 05A051, Revision 4, dated February 28, 2022 (EASB 05A051 Rev 4),
instead of Airbus Helicopters EASB No. 05A051 and EASB No. 05A046, each
Revision 2, and dated February 26, 2019.

The FAA agrees EASA AD 2019-0074R1 and EASB 05A051 Rev 4 are the
appropriate sources of related information for the actions specified,
and has revised this proposed AD to reference this updated information.

Request To Approve Future Revisions of the Service Information


Three commenters requested that the FAA revise the proposed AD to
consider the accomplishment of future revisions of EASB 05A051 Rev 4 as
acceptable for compliance with the proposed AD. Two commenters stated
EASA AD 2019-0074R1 allows the use of future revisions of the
applicable service information and requested that the FAA also allow
compliance with later revisions. One commenter stated later revisions
of the applicable service information should be allowed in order to
capture future applicable appendixes, swashplate serial numbers, and
swashplate manufacture dates.

The FAA disagrees with the request to allow future revisions of the
applicable service information as acceptable for compliance with the
proposed AD. Referring to documents that do not exist at the time the
final rule is published violates Office of the Federal Register (OFR)
regulations regarding approval of materials "incorporated by
reference'' in rules. These OFR regulations require that either the
service document be submitted for approval by the OFR as "referenced''
material, in which case it may be simply called out in the text of an
AD, or the service document contents be published as part of the actual
AD language. An AD may reference only the specific service document
that was submitted and approved by the OFR for "incorporation by
reference.'' In order for operators to use later revisions of the
referenced document (issued after the publication of the AD), either
the FAA must revise the AD to reference the specific later revisions,
or operators must request the approval of their use as an alternative
method of compliance under the provisions of paragraph (j) of this
proposed AD.

Request To Revise the Background Section of the Proposed AD


One commenter requested that the FAA revise the background section
of the NPRM to indicate that no cracks to the swashplate have been
detected in service, but testing by Airbus Helicopters determined that
cracks could develop over time.
The FAA agrees with the commenter and has revised the Actions Since
the NPRM was Issued section in this proposed AD accordingly.

FAA's Determination


These helicopters have been approved by EASA and are approved for
operation in the United States. Pursuant to the FAA's bilateral
agreement with the European Union, EASA has notified the FAA about the
unsafe condition described in its AD. The FAA is proposing this AD
after determining the unsafe condition described previously is likely
to exist or develop in other helicopters of the same type design.
Certain changes described above expand the scope of the NPRM. As a
result, it is necessary to reopen the comment period to provide
additional opportunity for the public to comment on this SNPRM.

Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51


The FAA reviewed one document that co-publishes two Airbus
Helicopters EASB identification numbers: EASB 05A051 Rev 4 for Model
EC225LP helicopters and EASB No. 05A046 for non-FAA type-certificated
Model EC725AP helicopters, Revision 4, dated February 28, 2022 (EASB
05A046 Rev 4). This service information specifies inspections for
swashplate P/N 332A31-3074-00 and P/N 332A31-3074-01. This service
information specifies procedures for a repetitive inspection of the
yokes for a crack and a one-time inspection of the stripped yokes for
corrosion and a crack. If in doubt about whether there is a crack, this
service information specifies performing a nondestructive inspection.

Additionally, this service information specifies touching up the
swashplate with varnish if there is corrosion, removing any damage
within allowable limits, and refinishing the yokes. If there is a crack
in a yoke, this service information specifies replacing the swashplate.
This service information also specifies a life limit of 13 years since
the date of manufacture for the swashplates and reporting requirements
if a crack or corrosion is discovered. EASB 05A051 Rev 4 also updates
the list of serial numbers and manufacture dates of the swashplates.
EASB 05A046 Rev 4, dated February 28, 2022, is not proposed for
incorporation by reference in this SNPRM.

This service information is reasonably available because the
interested parties have access to it through their normal course of
business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section.

Proposed AD Requirements in This SNPRM


This proposed AD would retain some of the requirements of AD 2020-
23-05. This proposed AD would also require compliance with a revised
life limit, a repetitive visual inspection of the yokes on swashplates
that have accumulated 7 or more years, but less than 13 years, since
the date of manufacture; and if a crack is detected, removing the
swashplate from service. If no cracks are detected but a scratch or
surface degradation is detected, this proposed AD would require
performing a dye penetrant inspection of the yoke. If a crack is
detected during the dye penetrant inspection, this proposed AD would
require removing the swashplate from service.

Differences Between This SNPRM and EASA AD 2019-0074R1 or the Service
Information


EASB 05A051 Rev 4 requires performing a non-destructive inspection
if in doubt about whether there is a crack in a yoke. This proposed AD
would require a visual inspection and if no cracks are detected,
visually inspecting for a scratch and surface degradation. If a scratch
or surface degradation is detected, this proposed AD would require a
non-destructive inspection (dye penetrant inspection). EASB 05A051 Rev
4 also specifies sending the swashplate back to Airbus Helicopters if
cracks are found, whereas this proposed AD would not require sending
any affected parts back to Airbus Helicopters.

EASA AD 2019-0074R1 specifies instructions for reporting inspection
results, whereas this proposed AD would not require reporting
inspection results.

Costs of Compliance


The FAA estimates that this AD, if adopted as proposed, would
affect 28 helicopters of U.S. Registry. Labor rates are estimated at
$85 per work-hour. Based on these numbers, the FAA estimates the
following costs to comply with this proposed AD.

Estimated Costs for Required Actions

ACTION
LABOR COST
PARTS
COST
COST PER
PRODUCT
COST ON U.S.
OPERATORS
Determination of the manufacture date of the swashplate. 0.5 work-hour x $85 per hour = $43.
$0
$43 $1,204.
Inspecting the yokes. 0.5 work-hour x $85 per hour = $43 per inspection cycle.
0
43 per inspection cycle 1,204 per inspection cycle.
Removing grease, stripping the yokes, and inspecting the stripped yokes. 8 work-hours x $85 per hour = $680.
0
680 19,040.
Creating a life limit record. 1 work-hour x $85 per hour = $85.
0
85 2,380.

The FAA estimates the following costs to do any necessary on-
condition actions that would be required based on the results of any
required actions. The FAA has no way of determining the number of
aircraft that might need these on-condition actions:

Estimated Costs of On-Condition Actions

ACTION
LABOR COST
PARTS COST
COST PER PRODUCT
Removing any corrosion or repairing damage within the allowable limit. 3 work-hours x $85 per hour = $255.
$0
$255
Replacing the swashplate. 6 work-hours x $85 per hour = $510.
85,661
86,171
Dye-penetrant inspection. 6 work-hours x $85 per hour = $510.
50
560

Authority for This Rulemaking

Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs,
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.

The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General requirements.
Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight
of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for
practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary
for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that
authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to
exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings


The FAA determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism
implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not
have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship
between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.

For the reasons discussed, I certify this proposed regulation:

(1) Is not a "significant regulatory action'' under Executive Order 12866,

(2) Would not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and

(3) Would not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39


Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

The Proposed Amendment


Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES


01. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.

Sec. 39.13 [Amended]


2. The FAA amends Sec. 39.13 by:

a. Removing Airworthiness Directive 2020-23-05, Amendment 39-21321 (85
FR 73604, November 19, 2020; and

b. Adding the following new airworthiness directive: